Thursday, May 26, 2016

Concealed Carry Mistakes





Several years ago, I had the opportunity to travel to Gunsite for a two-day seminar called “Pocket Pistols and Penlights.” An original idea of Dave Biggers, formerly of XS Sight Systems, the course was a way to explore what Dave called “the guns and flashlights that people really carry.” Meanwhile the guns used were popular snub revolvers and pocket-sized .380’s, in conjunction with the palm-sized Surefire Back-Up flashlight. Gunsite instructor Giles Stock led the class, mostly writers and industry executives, in a number of drills and exercises designed to simulate street combat. While I came away from the seminar with a greater respect for the capabilities of these small guns, I also came away with a greater understanding of what I already knew...I don’t want to have to rely on one of these ultra-compact guns to defend my life or the lives of those I care about, period!

I realized long ago that gunfights are quick but complicated affairs, often times won by the person who can “see through the fog” first and deliver accurate fire at their opponent. This is complicated enough, but to add to it by carrying a gun so small you cannot get your whole hand around it seems a bit, well…crazy! I learned this valuable lesson a number of years ago while out to dinner with my family. My kids were small then and I figured that we were going to a “nice” area for dinner, so I dropped a small .25 caliber semi-auto into a pocket of my summer shorts. While trying to help my wife cut our kid’s food as it was served, I heard the front door of the restaurant open and a man enter with a rifle! Bad things happen to good people in “nice” places...

For a moment I thought that things were going downhill fast, but then noted that the rifle was a muzzleloader. I then remembered that an antique store shared the restaurant’s premises and it all fell into place as to what was really happening...he was coming in to sell the gun to the store. Whew...dodged the bullet that time. But what if it hadn’t been an innocent circumstance? What if it had been a real active shooter...a term that did not exist then! It made me rethink what I was doing and come to terms with why I was really carrying a gun. After all, it’s not a fashion statement—it’s a tool for personal security. My weekend at Gunsite made me revisit at the phenomenon of pocket guns and the “carry convenience” they possess.

While the allure of pocket guns is certainly a year-round thing, it is the warm months of summer that really make people contemplate their “carry-ability.” After all, when it gets hot, it’s natural for people to want to wear less clothing to help compensate for the rising mercury. Shorts, t-shirts and sandals become the norm, making concealed carry of a larger handgun increasingly difficult. But again, why are we carrying a gun in the first place? Are we carrying it because it makes us feel secure or are we carrying it because we want to BE secure? They are not the same thing. Lets go a bit further... if you were in my shoes in the incident I described earlier, except the threat was real, is this the moment that you want to rely on an easy-to-carry gun or do you want to fill your hand with a heavy hitter? Convenience does not equate to effectiveness, and at that particular moment I wanted a .50 caliber, belt fed, machine gun... but I can’t find a holster to carry it.

While I do realize that concealing a larger handgun is problematic, it is not impossible. It just requires a bit of thought and planning. First, you don’t try to fit a gun into your mode of dress—you dress around the gun. Several of the tactical clothing manufacturers make casual clothing with the expressed intent of concealing firearms year round and are worth a look. At the same time, it’s not hard to take the clothing that you have and make it work for warm weather concealment. For example, are you headed out for the evening in a pair of shorts, sandals and a t-shirt? Add an open front short sleeve dress shirt to the ensemble. It’s easy to do and my more fashion-sensitive spouse (she calls khaki tactical vests “fashion emergencies”!) says that it actually looks good. If the evening is breezy, just button the middle button and if the gun is needed quickly, rip the shirt open! What is one button when your life is on the line? Better yet, a small tab of Velcro is low key and can accomplish the same task.

The safari or photojournalist vest that was so popular for many years (see above wife’s comment!) is pretty much blown with the criminal community. A few years back, I was guarding a felon who was watching a number of federal agents come and go wearing khaki cargo pants and safari vest combos. He looked at me and said, “Who are they kidding? Do they really think no one knows they’re cops wearing that get up?” While a summer weight vest can still be a good choice for concealment, you might want to pick a style that does not look like what fellow writer/trainer Mike Boyle calls “contractor casual,” referring to the unofficial uniform of security contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan. Any number of companies make plain vests that don’t scream “gun carrier”, my favorite comes from The North Face.

Take a look at how folks are dressed in the area where you work and live. You might be surprised to note that many people are wearing clothing that would allow you to carry a larger handgun, provided you are willing to make the lifestyle commitment. My friend Massad Ayoob once told me that any standard dress shirt could be used for concealment provided it was “opaquely woven”, meaning there is no chance someone could see through the fabric. A square bottom dress shirt is easy to use for concealment, however, these days any shirt tail, regardless of length or cut, is fashionable when worn out—which is in direct contradiction to how my mother taught me to dress. It’s been a bit of adjustment, but I have learned to embrace this new fashion trend, especially when wearing a concealed gun in the summer months.

When selecting a carry gun and holster, it is wise to keep in mind that it will be carried under lighter clothing, so buying a holster that will help keep it close, but accessible, is important. For me, the gun was a no-brainer...I carry my Glock 19 year round, which gives me continuity of gear as well as peace of mind. Having confidence that my gear will work at the moment of truth is a huge advantage over any potential opponent, so I carry the G19 regardless of weather. I am also unconcerned about the whole stopping- power/9mm debate, as I realize it is shot placement that will produce incapacitation. But to ensure that I have as much edge as possible, I load my G19 with Corbon 115 grain DPX all copper hollow points. Travelling just under 1,300 fps from the 4-inch barrel of my Glock, the all copper expands AND penetrates, even when intermediate barriers are present.

As far as a holster and magazine pouch is concerned, I have just started using gear from Black Point Holsters. This semi-square Kydex rig is combined with leather tabs that hold dual belt slots. The high ride and flat configuration help hold the gun in tight for excellent concealment, even in light summer clothing. Custom desires? No problem! Black Point will work with each customer and charges no additional cost for custom features like degree of cant, belt loop width, molded for a weapon mounted light or any other reasonable modification.  I still ike my CAP Holster as sold by Templar Custom Arms, but I do like to try new carry rigs on occasion.

Recently, I stumbled on a well-used Mile Spark Executive Companion originally made for a Smith & Wesson 3913. I had not worn the holster in over a decade, but I have always liked the rig and its soft, well-worn holster body was certainly inviting.  Possessing a holster-boning tool, I soaked the EX in a sink of warm water and then re-modeled (“boning” for those who are not familiar with leather holster terminology…I do expect some soft-minded troll to make a joke here) it for my G19. It works great and I have been wearing it of late.

Once you have made the lifestyle commitment to not only go armed but also go armed with a fighting-size handgun, practice will be the final part of the equation. It’s important to go to the range and practice in the dress and weather in which you will be carrying. Heat and humidity can make gear stick or slick as can rain, so know how your holster and related gear will perform when wet or covered with sweat. How well will the light summer shirt “clear” during a rapid concealed draw? It will be different than a heavier garment, so “flinging it” back out of the way might not be as advisable as staying in contact with the garment and “evacuating it” instead. How will movement affect your light summer clothing? Standing still in a fight makes you an easier target, so practice drawing while aggressively moving with the garment you will use for concealment.

If you happen to be out shopping this summer and are caught in the middle of this nation’s next active killer event, you will be glad that you made the commitment to be armed with a handful of gun carried in quality gear that you can count on. Anything less will not be exactly confidence inspiring.





9 comments:

  1. I agree that carrying a full size handgun is optimal. However, what do those of us who have to wear polo's or dress shirts tucked into khakis to work do? Getting made is 100% not an option. Small auto's or small revo's in pocket, belly band, or (god forbid) ankle carry seem to be the name of the game in my currently non permissive environment.

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  2. My summer uniform is "relaxed" trousers or cargo shorts, with a solid color tee-shirt tucked in and a Hawaiian shirt (open front) over that. That easily hides the Glock 19 on my belt, plus the extra magazine on the other side. If a opt for a J-frame wheel gun, cargo pants/shorts also do a lot to prevent "printing" especially with a pocket holster and speed strips.

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  3. Would be interesting to see trainers have a cargo shorts and flip flops course. No "tactical dress" allowed. I'd sign up!

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  5. I'm semi-retired, so I can wear jeans and t-shirt 365 days a year. I always wear lace-up footwear when I go out, no sandals or flip-flops for me. If I have to run, I'm sure as hell not running barefoot!

    Most all of my t-shirts will completely cover my Hi-Power carried IWB in a Milt Sparks VM-II on my right side and a spare mag & flashlight on my left.

    Do I get hot? Yep. Do I care? Nope. Do I have a full-size service type pistol with which to engage a bad guy or guys? Yep.

    Good article.

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  6. It is very interesting and informative as well. I found what I was looking for a long time. Thanks For Sharing this..here we have the best Concealed carry holsters on the planet! (IWB) In waistband, ankle and pocket holsters.

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  7. I always carry my Glock 17 with full mag and 1 in the pipe. I am smaller in stature so I use an Alien gear holster and wear it in the small of my back. I can conceal this full size glock and draw very quickly and efficiently and aquire my target. Muscle memory training is important and I have instilled this into my decision to carry a full size Glock. In the summer I wear shorts with a quality thick leather belt and an unturned t shirt. I feel very safe with this set up. With the decision to always carry I weighed out different scenarios and spoke with experts and asked their opinions. The course instructed from Blackhawk defense told me to carry the largest capacity firearm that I felt would actually be realistic and able to hit your target with accuracy. He agreed with my decision and with the way I chose to conceal my firearm. I am so used to it after years of carrying I do not even notice it. I totally agree that you dress around your firearm. I am 5'9 and 165lbs and I guarantee you cannot tell I am carrying. Be smart Be safe and train,train,train.

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  8. I always carry my Glock 17 with full mag and 1 in the pipe. I am smaller in stature so I use an Alien gear holster and wear it in the small of my back. I can conceal this full size glock and draw very quickly and efficiently and aquire my target. Muscle memory training is important and I have instilled this into my decision to carry a full size Glock. In the summer I wear shorts with a quality thick leather belt and an unturned t shirt. I feel very safe with this set up. With the decision to always carry I weighed out different scenarios and spoke with experts and asked their opinions. The course instructed from Blackhawk defense told me to carry the largest capacity firearm that I felt would actually be realistic and able to hit your target with accuracy. He agreed with my decision and with the way I chose to conceal my firearm. I am so used to it after years of carrying I do not even notice it. I totally agree that you dress around your firearm. I am 5'9 and 165lbs and I guarantee you cannot tell I am carrying. Be smart Be safe and train,train,train.

    ReplyDelete
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